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Hundreds of Women Sue Johnson & Johnson over Use of Talcum Powder

Women Sue Johnson & Johnson over Use of Talcum Powder

Women Sue Johnson & Johnson over Use of Talcum Powder


The litigation against Johnson & Johnson over talcum powder continues to grow, as hundreds of women have filed a lawsuit alleging that the soft powder product caused ovarian cancer. The pharmaceutical giant was allegedly negligent with regards to the risks of their talcum powder products, such include Baby Powder and Shower to Shower. The women allege that J&J should have warned that use of talcum powder in the genital area could increase the risk of ovarian cancer.

FairWarning, a non-profit investigative news organization, reports that a number of studies link talcum powder to an increased risk of ovarian cancer. “Since the early 1980s, a slew of studies had found that women who regularly used talc powder for feminine hygiene had higher than average rates of ovarian cancer.” according to an article posted April 29th. More Hundreds of Women Sue Johnson & Johnson over Use of Talcum Powder

Supreme Court Denies Certiorari in Case involving New York Anti-Subrogation Law

Court Denies Certiorari in NY Anti-Subrogation Law Case

Court Denies Certiorari in NY Anti-Subrogation Law Case


The Supreme Court has denied certiorari in a case involving New York’s anti-subrogation law. The decision, issued on February 23, 2015, supports a lower court’s ruling that the law is not preempted by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).

Subrogation is when an insurance company can seek reimbursement for funds paid on behalf of the insured. New York’s anti-subrogation law prevents private health insurers from seeking reimbursement for medical benefits paid out of a tort settlement. Last July, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled that the law is not preempted by ERISA. More Supreme Court Denies Certiorari in Case involving New York Anti-Subrogation Law

FDA Says Testosterone Drugs are Overused, Linked to Cardiovascular Problems

FDA Says Testosterone Drugs are Overused

FDA Says Testosterone Drugs are Overused


For years, drug makers have been marketing testosterone replacement drugs as a means to treat common signs of aging in men, such as decreased sex drive and fatigue. This aggressive marketing has boosted sales of the product, but it may have also caused harm. According to the Associated Press, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning that these drugs are overused and linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular problems.

Testosterone replacement therapies come in patches, gels, pills and injections. Abbvie, Eli Lilly & Co. and other manufacturers have marketed the products to treat low testosterone, or “Low-T”. The companies push the drugs to treat symptoms of “Low-T”, which include common signs of aging such as decreased mood or low libido. More FDA Says Testosterone Drugs are Overused, Linked to Cardiovascular Problems

Measure that Offers Financial Incentives to Auto Industry Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate Floor

Financial Incentives to Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate

Financial Incentives to Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate

A United States Senate panel unanimously voted in support of a measure that would offer financial incentives for auto industry employees who reveal safety defects.

Thirteen Republican and Democratic members of the Senate, Science and Transportation Committee voted to send the legislation to the floor of the Senate. The measure would allow whistleblowers to share in auto company penalty payments. The legislation was prompted by recalls of millions of vehicles by General Motors (GM) over faulty ignition switches and Takata Corp airbag inflators, according to Reuters. More Measure that Offers Financial Incentives to Auto Industry Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate Floor

Maine Department of Health and Human Services Settles Whistleblower Suit with Former Employee

Maine Dept of HHS Settles Suit with Former Employee

Maine Dept of HHS Settles Suit with Former Employee


A former employee of the Maine Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) will receive $142,500 from the department to settle a federal whistleblower suit.

The former division director for the Maine Center for Disease Control (CDC) sued DHHS and her bosses at the CDC, alleging that she was harassed and retaliated against for refusing to shred public documents. The DHHS released the settlement agreement last Friday, according to the Sun Journal (SJ). More Maine Department of Health and Human Services Settles Whistleblower Suit with Former Employee

Whistleblower Vindicated in Case Alleging Contracting Violations at Florida Park

A former employee of Canaveral National Seashore has won a whistleblower retaliation ruling against the U.S. Department of Interior.

In December, a federal civil service court judge in Atlanta ruled that the former employee, who had reported contracting violations, nepotism and other misconduct at the park, had been subjected to assault, harassment and adverse personal actions in retaliation for blowing the whistle on the park’s activities, according to Florida Today. More Whistleblower Vindicated in Case Alleging Contracting Violations at Florida Park

Cancer Groups Issue Joint Statement Calling for More Regulation of E-Cigarettes, but Some Experts say it Doesn’t go Far Enough

Statement Issued Calling for More Regulation of E-Cigarettes

Statement Issued Calling for More Regulation of
E-Cigarettes


This past December, a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) survey revealed how popular e-cigarettes are becoming among young people, and now two major cancer groups are calling on the government to regulate these devices.

NIDA reported that 17 percent of high school seniors said they had vaped at least once a month, compared with 14 percent who admitted smoking traditional cigarettes. Sixteen percent of 10th graders said they had vaped, which was more than twice the number of students who said they had smoked regular cigarettes. E-cigarettes are growing in popularity among young people, in part, because they come in all sorts of tempting flavors, from fruit to root beer. If the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Association of Cancer Research have their way, it will soon be much more difficult for teenagers to get their hands on e-cigarettes. More Cancer Groups Issue Joint Statement Calling for More Regulation of E-Cigarettes, but Some Experts say it Doesn’t go Far Enough

Bronx Hit-and-Run Leaves One Teenager Dead, Another Critically Injured

Bronx Hit-and-Run Leaves One Dead, Another Injured

Bronx Hit-and-Run Leaves One Dead, Another Injured

CBS New York and Associated Press report that a hit-and-run in the Bronx left one teenager dead and another critically injured. According to police, a 16-year-old boy and 15-year-girl were crossing Baychester Avenue just after 5 p.m. Sunday. A Honda Accord heading north struck the teens. More Bronx Hit-and-Run Leaves One Teenager Dead, Another Critically Injured

SSRIs Linked to Doubled Risk of Upper GI Bleeding

SSRIs_Associated_Two-Fold-Increased_Risk_Upper_GI_Bleeding_Study_Finds Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are drugs that are used to treat depression. New research evaluating data from multiple studies, however, suggests that there may be a two-fold increased risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding.

According to Healio, a study published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology found a 55 percent increased risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRI use, although there was a notable amount of heterogeneity across studies. The study was conducted by researchers from China, who performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of 22 studies. The studies were published between 1999 and 2014 and involved more than 1,073,000 individuals. More SSRIs Linked to Doubled Risk of Upper GI Bleeding

Health Canada Warns that Some Insulin Pumps have Risk of Tubing Detachment

Unomedical a/s in consultation with Health Canada waned that insulin pump infusion sets manufactured by Medtronic of Canada Inc., Roche Diagnostics, LifeScan Canada Inc, and Auto Control Medical Inc. have a risk of tubing detachment. In an urgent safety notification issued November 21st, Health Canada stated that manufacturers have been receiving growing reports of tubing become detached from the connect/disconnect location.

Insulin pumps are used to deliver insulin through a catheter in the skin in patients with diabetes. The infusion sets can be programmed to administer small doses of insulin continuously or a larger dose close to mealtime to control blood sugar. More Health Canada Warns that Some Insulin Pumps have Risk of Tubing Detachment