To Get Help Now
Uncategorized
Click Here
 
Today's Date:

Measure that Offers Financial Incentives to Auto Industry Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate Floor

A United States Senate panel unanimously voted in support of a measure that would offer financial incentives for auto industry employees who reveal safety defects.

Thirteen Republican and Democratic members of the Senate, Science and Transportation Committee voted to send the legislation to the floor of the Senate. The measure would allow whistleblowers to share in auto company penalty payments. The legislation was prompted by recalls of millions of vehicles by General Motors (GM) over faulty ignition switches and Takata Corp airbag inflators, according to Reuters. More Measure that Offers Financial Incentives to Auto Industry Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate Floor

Maine Department of Health and Human Services Settles Whistleblower Suit with Former Employee

Maine Dept of HHS Settles Suit with Former Employee

Maine Dept of HHS Settles Suit with Former Employee


A former employee of the Maine Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) will receive $142,500 from the department to settle a federal whistleblower suit.

The former division director for the Maine Center for Disease Control (CDC) sued DHHS and her bosses at the CDC, alleging that she was harassed and retaliated against for refusing to shred public documents. The DHHS released the settlement agreement last Friday, according to the Sun Journal (SJ). More Maine Department of Health and Human Services Settles Whistleblower Suit with Former Employee

Whistleblower Vindicated in Case Alleging Contracting Violations at Florida Park

A former employee of Canaveral National Seashore has won a whistleblower retaliation ruling against the U.S. Department of Interior.

In December, a federal civil service court judge in Atlanta ruled that the former employee, who had reported contracting violations, nepotism and other misconduct at the park, had been subjected to assault, harassment and adverse personal actions in retaliation for blowing the whistle on the park’s activities, according to Florida Today. More Whistleblower Vindicated in Case Alleging Contracting Violations at Florida Park

Cancer Groups Issue Joint Statement Calling for More Regulation of E-Cigarettes, but Some Experts say it Doesn’t go Far Enough

Statement Issued Calling for More Regulation of E-Cigarettes

Statement Issued Calling for More Regulation of
E-Cigarettes


This past December, a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) survey revealed how popular e-cigarettes are becoming among young people, and now two major cancer groups are calling on the government to regulate these devices.

NIDA reported that 17 percent of high school seniors said they had vaped at least once a month, compared with 14 percent who admitted smoking traditional cigarettes. Sixteen percent of 10th graders said they had vaped, which was more than twice the number of students who said they had smoked regular cigarettes. E-cigarettes are growing in popularity among young people, in part, because they come in all sorts of tempting flavors, from fruit to root beer. If the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Association of Cancer Research have their way, it will soon be much more difficult for teenagers to get their hands on e-cigarettes. More Cancer Groups Issue Joint Statement Calling for More Regulation of E-Cigarettes, but Some Experts say it Doesn’t go Far Enough

Bronx Hit-and-Run Leaves One Teenager Dead, Another Critically Injured

Bronx Hit-and-Run Leaves One Dead, Another Injured

Bronx Hit-and-Run Leaves One Dead, Another Injured

CBS New York and Associated Press report that a hit-and-run in the Bronx left one teenager dead and another critically injured. According to police, a 16-year-old boy and 15-year-girl were crossing Baychester Avenue just after 5 p.m. Sunday. A Honda Accord heading north struck the teens. More Bronx Hit-and-Run Leaves One Teenager Dead, Another Critically Injured

SSRIs Linked to Doubled Risk of Upper GI Bleeding

SSRIs_Associated_Two-Fold-Increased_Risk_Upper_GI_Bleeding_Study_Finds Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are drugs that are used to treat depression. New research evaluating data from multiple studies, however, suggests that there may be a two-fold increased risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding.

According to Healio, a study published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology found a 55 percent increased risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRI use, although there was a notable amount of heterogeneity across studies. The study was conducted by researchers from China, who performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of 22 studies. The studies were published between 1999 and 2014 and involved more than 1,073,000 individuals. More SSRIs Linked to Doubled Risk of Upper GI Bleeding

Health Canada Warns that Some Insulin Pumps have Risk of Tubing Detachment

Unomedical a/s in consultation with Health Canada waned that insulin pump infusion sets manufactured by Medtronic of Canada Inc., Roche Diagnostics, LifeScan Canada Inc, and Auto Control Medical Inc. have a risk of tubing detachment. In an urgent safety notification issued November 21st, Health Canada stated that manufacturers have been receiving growing reports of tubing become detached from the connect/disconnect location.

Insulin pumps are used to deliver insulin through a catheter in the skin in patients with diabetes. The infusion sets can be programmed to administer small doses of insulin continuously or a larger dose close to mealtime to control blood sugar. More Health Canada Warns that Some Insulin Pumps have Risk of Tubing Detachment

Medications Most Frequent Trigger of Fatal Allergic Reactions, Study Suggests

Death from serious allergic reactions, or anaphylaxis, is most often triggered by medications, a study suggests. Researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Weill-Cornell Medical College published a study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology analyzing the triggers for anaphylaxis-related deaths.

The study looked at 2,458 anaphylaxis-related deaths that occurred between 1999 and 2010 using diagnostic codes on death certificates identified in the US National Mortality Database. More Medications Most Frequent Trigger of Fatal Allergic Reactions, Study Suggests

Boston Scientific Sees First Federal Trials over Transvaginal Mesh

For the first time, federal trials are taking place over allegations that Boston Scientific’s transvaginal mesh implants caused injuries in women. According to Reuters, one trial taking place in Charleston, West Virginia involves four women implanted with the Obytryx transvaginal mesh to treat stress urinary incontinence. The second trial is taking place in Miami, and involves women implanted with the Pinnacle used to treat pelvic organ prolapse.

Pelvic organ prolapse is when the organs begin to droop from their normal location and push against the walls of the vaginal. Stress urinary incontinence is the involuntary release of urine during everyday activities such as laughing or sneezing. Transvaginal mesh is supposed to treat these conditions by providing additional support to the pelvic walls and muscles, but numerous women allege that the devices only caused more problems. The devices have allegedly caused complications such as pain, bleeding, nerve damage and mesh erosion. Transvaginal mesh devices is now one of the most sued-over medical devices, Reuters reports. More Boston Scientific Sees First Federal Trials over Transvaginal Mesh

Potential Settlement may Resolve another 1,000 ASR Lawsuits for $250 million

Johnson & Johnson may settle another 1,000 ASR hip implant lawsuits for $250 million. According to Bloomberg, two people familiar with the litigation said that the company is considering whether or not to offer the same settlement terms it used to resolve 8,000 ASR cases, where the company agreed to pay $250,000 per surgery and over any related medical expenses. The recalled metal-on-metal hip implant is defectively designed and causes complications through the release of metal debris, patients allege.

“This is a sign that J&J is trying to get a solid handle on its whole ASR problem,” a professor of product-liability law at the University of Richmond in Virginia told Bloomberg. “They are not done paying yet, but they are moving in the right direction.” More Potential Settlement may Resolve another 1,000 ASR Lawsuits for $250 million