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Lawmakers Call on the FDA to ban Amphetamine-like Stimulant Found in Some Dietary Supplements

Lawmakers Call on the FDA to ban Amphetamine-like Stimulant

Lawmakers Call to FDA – ban Amphetamine-like Stimulant


Lawmakers are calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to take action against dietary supplement makers who include a potentially dangerous, amphetamine-like stimulant in their products.

BMPEA is an amphetamine-like stimulant first synthesized in the 1930s as a replacement for amphetamine. The chemical has never been tested in humans and is not an authorized dietary supplement ingredient under federal law. Supplement makers have been hiding BMPEA in their products under the name “acacia rigidula,” which is an exotic shrub native to Mexico and southern Texas. Canadian health authorities pulled a popular supplement from store shelves and forced a recall of the product in December, according to The New York Times (The Times.) More Lawmakers Call on the FDA to ban Amphetamine-like Stimulant Found in Some Dietary Supplements

Contaminated Duodenoscopes also Linked to Drug-Resistant E. Coli Outbreak

Contaminated Duodenoscopes also Linked to E. Coli Outbreak

Contaminated Duodenoscopes also Linked to E. Coli Outbreak

Tainted duodenoscopes, which have come under scrutiny in light of a series of superbug outbreaks, are also associated with an outbreak of drug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a Washington state hospital. According to a study published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, patients can still be infected even when following manufacturers’ cleaning instructions.

An investigation revealed that between November 2012 and August 2013,32 patients were infected with an antibiotic-resistant strain of E. coli at Seattle Virginia Mason Medical Center. The hospital had followed the manufacturer’s cleaning protocol, but these procedures were apparently insufficient.

Recent evidence suggests that manufacturers’ cleaning instructions alone are not enough to sterilize duodenoscopes, a specialized type of endoscope. Recently, the devices were implicated in recent outbreaks of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) at two Los Angeles Hospitals: UCLA’s Ronald Reagan Medical Center and Cedars-Sinai hospital. A total of 11 patients were infected with CRE at the two hospitals and 246 more were potentially exposed.
More Contaminated Duodenoscopes also Linked to Drug-Resistant E. Coli Outbreak

Flooring Company Facing Class Action Over Allegations That it Sells Defective Products Containing High Levels of Formaldehyde

Company Facing Class Action Over Selling Defective Products

Company Facing Class Action Over Selling Defective Products


The first amended class action complaint has been filed against Lumber Liquidators alleging that some of the company’s flooring products fail prematurely, contain defects and have been associated with very high levels of the cancer-causing agent, formaldehyde.

Plaintiffs in the class action lawsuit allege that their Lumber Liquidators flooring is defective and prone to premature cracking, splitting, warping and shrinking sooner than claimed in the product’s warranty. According to the suit, consumers have also complained that Lumber Liquidator’s flooring contains significantly high levels of formaldehyde, a known carcinogen. More Flooring Company Facing Class Action Over Allegations That it Sells Defective Products Containing High Levels of Formaldehyde

OxyElite Pro Found to Contain Prozac

OxyElite Pro Found to Contain Prozac

OxyElite Pro Found to Contain Prozac


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) told consumers on February 28 to be extra vigilant when purchasing weight loss supplements, specifically mentioning OxyElite Pro, which was found to contain a powerful antidepressant drug.

OxyElite Pro is a thermogenic supplement. It is designed to boost metabolism and burn fat, but it increases the body’s internal temperature. More OxyElite Pro Found to Contain Prozac

Measure that Offers Financial Incentives to Auto Industry Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate Floor

Financial Incentives to Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate

Financial Incentives to Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate

A United States Senate panel unanimously voted in support of a measure that would offer financial incentives for auto industry employees who reveal safety defects.

Thirteen Republican and Democratic members of the Senate, Science and Transportation Committee voted to send the legislation to the floor of the Senate. The measure would allow whistleblowers to share in auto company penalty payments. The legislation was prompted by recalls of millions of vehicles by General Motors (GM) over faulty ignition switches and Takata Corp airbag inflators, according to Reuters. More Measure that Offers Financial Incentives to Auto Industry Whistleblowers to Reach the Senate Floor

Heart Monitor App Crashes, Prompting Recall

AliveCor has recalled one of its heart monitor apps due to the app crashing upon use.

More than 5,000 active iOS users are affected by the recall, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said in a recall notice. The AliveECG app works in tandem with the AliveCor Heart Monitor to record electrocardiograms and detect the presence of atrial fibrillation and normal sinus rhythm when prescribed by or under the guidance of a physician. The FDA has designated this as a Class III recall, according to HITConsultant.net More Heart Monitor App Crashes, Prompting Recall

Jury Rules Toyota Motor Co. was 60 Percent Responsible for Fatal Camry Crash

Jury Rules Toyota was 60% Responsible for Fatal Crash

Jury Rules Toyota was 60% Responsible for Fatal Crash


A federal jury on Tuesday decided that Toyota Motor Co. was partly to blame for a 2006 car crash that killed three people and left two seriously injured, and resulted in a wrongful conviction.

The jury awarded the victims and their family members $11 million after concluding that Toyota was 60 percent to blame for the accident. The case revolved around Koua Fong Lee, who in 2006 was driving his 1996 Toyota Camry when it accelerated wildly into traffic and crashed into another vehicle, killing the driver of the other vehicle, Javis Trice-Adams Sr., and his 9-year-old son, Javis Adams Jr. His 6-year-old niece, Devyn Bolton, was paralyzed and died in October 2007. His daughter, Jasmine Adams, then 12, was seriously injured, as was his father, Quincy Ray Adams. Those two and Devyn Bolton’s mother, Bridgette Trice, were the other plaintiffs in the case, along with Lee and four of his family members who were in his car at the time of the crash, according to the Associated Press (AP). More Jury Rules Toyota Motor Co. was 60 Percent Responsible for Fatal Camry Crash

Pennsylvania Senator Robert Casey Pushes for a ban on Powdered Caffeine

A Pennsylvania senator said Monday that he wants the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban powdered caffeine, a strong and potentially dangerous stimulant.

Senator Robert Casey said he has written a letter to the head of the FDA about his concerns over the powerful stimulant. Teens and young adults are increasingly using the supplement to work out, lose weight, and stay up late to study. At least two deaths have been linked to powdered caffeine, which is easy to purchase. One teaspoon of the substance is the equivalent to 25 cups of coffee, according to CBS Philly. More Pennsylvania Senator Robert Casey Pushes for a ban on Powdered Caffeine

Infuse Should not be Used in Patients Under age 18, the FDA Warns

In a Safety Communication issued today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that Infuse and other bone graft substitutes containing recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides are not safe for use in patients under age 18.

Infuse and other bone graft substitutes containing recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides are considered high-risk (Class III) medical devices by the FDA. Medtronic and the manufacturers of similar products must submit a premarket approval application (PMA) to the agency that includes clinical data supporting safety and effectiveness, the FDA explained in the Safety Communication. These devices have not been approved for use in people under age 18 and have not been reviewed by federal regulators. More Infuse Should not be Used in Patients Under age 18, the FDA Warns

Many People are Losing Faith in the Safety of E-Cigarettes, but Teens are Vaping Even More

Many People are Losing Faith in the Safety of E-Cigarettes

Many People are Losing Faith in the Safety of
E-Cigarettes


Last year, the American Journal of Preventative Medicine issued a report showing that 65 percent of smokers said they believed that e-cigarettes are safer than smoking regular cigarettes in 2013, down from 85 percent in 2010.

In high schools across America, however, vaping is on the rise. This past December, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) reported that 17 percent of high school seniors said they’d vaped at least once a month, compared with 14 percent who admitted smoking traditional cigarettes. Sixteen percent of 10th graders said they had vaped, which was more than twice the number of students who said they had smoked regular cigarettes. More Many People are Losing Faith in the Safety of E-Cigarettes, but Teens are Vaping Even More