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More Arrests Following Death of Nursing Home Patient

Two more employees of the Medford Multicare Center for Living nursing home were arrested last week as part of an ongoing criminal negligence case involving the death of a resident in October 2012.

Marianne Fassino, 53, of Shirley, and Leona Gordon, 35, of Medford, were arrested in connection with the death of a 72-year-old female resident in what was supposed to be temporary rehabilitation, according to the release, Patchogue Patch, reported.  A few days earlier, reports surfaced that nine people were arrested in connection with the woman’s death, with one of the defendants being charged with criminally negligent homicide. More More Arrests Following Death of Nursing Home Patient

Nursing Home Owner and Three Former Employees Indicted by a Federal Grand Jury on Racketeering and Fraud Charges

Four people connected to the shuttered Brian Center nursing home in Scott County, Virginia, have been indicted by a federal grand jury on racketeering and healthcare fraud charges.

The indictment is the result of a joint investigation carried out by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General, IRS Criminal Investigations, the Virginia Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit and the Department of Labor’s Employee Benefits Security Administration, TImesNews.net wrote.

The Brian Center’s former owner was charged with one count of racketeering conspiracy, one count of conspiracy to commit wire, mail and healthcare fraud, 10 counts of wire fraud, one count of healthcare fraud, 55 counts of mail fraud, one count of obstruction of justice and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, TimesNews.net reported.

The former director of nursing operations was charged with one count of racketeering conspiracy, one count of conspiracy to commit wire, mail and healthcare fraud, eight counts of wire fraud, one count of healthcare fraud and one count of conspiracy to make false statements.

Each racketeering charge carries a maximum punishment of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The money laundering charges carry a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, according to TimesNews.net.

According to Tuesday’s indictment, the four carried out an elaborate scheme aimed at defrauding Medicare and Virginia Medicaid by operating the Brian Center without adequate staff or supplies, which violates federal nursing facility laws, TimesNews.net reported.

The group is also accused of defrauding center vendors and employees. Authorities say employees had money taken from their paychecks for benefits that were not provided, according to TimesNews.net.

Residents of the 90-bed Brian Center nursing home allegedly lived in unsanitary and unclean conditions and were subjected to poor nutrition, bed sores and other forms of neglect. Residents often went without basic hygiene, including bathing, toileting, cleaning, turning and feeding, TimesNews.net reported.

Nursing home residents have a legal right to live in an environment free of physical abuse and neglect. Care centers are required to meet minimum state and federal legislative standards of care to prevent nursing home injury and abuse.

Nursing homes that don’t abide by federal requirements for long-term care facilities as instructed under the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (42 CFR Part 483) cannot participate in Medicare or Medicaid programs. Under this “Residents’ Bill of Rights,” certain staffing levels are required to ensure residents’ physical, nutritional, medical and emotional needs are met.

The Brian Center, which made a 2010 list of the worst nursing homes in Virginia, had a long history of compliance problems. The home also once operated as Continuum Care, TimesNews.net reported.

The center closed in 2012 after the federal government took action to terminate the home’s ability to accept Medicare and Medicaid payments, according to TimesNews.net.

Two Charged With Striking Elderly Woman in Illinois Nursing Home

Video surveillance allegedly shows two aides at a Illinois nursing home striking an elderly woman with dementia.

Chemyra Barnett, 18, and Jacqueline Santos, 18, both of South Elgin, appeared in court Friday on charges of abuse. Each is charged with one count of aggravated battery of a person older than 60, a class 3 felony, and one count of illegal videotaping, according to the Chicago Tribune. More Two Charged With Striking Elderly Woman in Illinois Nursing Home

Minnesota Nursing Home Cited for Not Reviving Patient

St. Benedict’s Senior Community, a nursing home in St. Cloud, Minnesota, has been cited after staff members chose not to resuscitate a patient who had no pulse.

According to a report released Wednesday by the Minnesota Department of Health (DoH), the resident complained of dizziness and became unresponsive after walking to the dining room for lunch. Staff detected a pulse and proceeded to move the resident to the back of the room. Staff checked on the resident a short while later and found that she had no pulse, StarTribune.com reported. More Minnesota Nursing Home Cited for Not Reviving Patient

Nursing Home Abuse Caught on Camera

After noticing a handful of things she had bought for her 96-year-old mother had gone missing, Doris Racher placed a hidden camera in her mother’s room at an Oklahoma nursing home. Racher never found out who was taking her mother’s items, but instead found out her mother was being abused.

Racher watched in disgust as one aide stuffed latex gloves into Mrs. Eryetha Mayberry’s mouth, while another taunted her, the New York Times reported. The camera also saw a worker lift her from her wheelchair, and then fling her on a bed. Another worker performed a few heavy-handed chest compressions. Based on the videos, one aide pleaded guilty to abuse and neglect, while another appears to have fled the country, the New York Times reported. Sadly, scenes like the one Mrs. Mayberry endured have been reported in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and other states by relatives who placed hidden cameras in rooms to find out how their loved one was being treated.

Earlier this month, Oklahoma became the third state (New Mexico and Texas) to openly permit residents in long-term care facilities to maintain surveillance cameras in their rooms. In the last two years, five states have considered similar laws. While some states have administrative guidelines that allow for electronic monitoring, most legislative efforts have failed due to concerns over privacy rights.

Families are not the only ones who have used hidden cams to find out what is going on at these homes. According to the New York Times, last year that New York state attorney general’s office demonstrated its methods at a national training program for state investigators. In June, the Ohio state attorney general announced that his office, in correlation with the families, had placed cameras in residents’ rooms in an unspecified number of state facilities, the New York Times reported.

Nursing Home Near St. Louis Blamed for Injuries to Woman

The family of an 86-year-old woman with Alzheimer’s claim that the woman was abused by staffers of a west St. Louis County nursing home.

Robin Foster alleges that her mother’s eye was swollen and closed shut after what the Delmar Garden’s West Nursing Home claimed was a bad fall. Foster told KMOV.com that there was no way the injury was caused by the fall. The nursing home claimed that the woman fell in her bedroom. However, Foster said the pictures provided by the hospital show her mother suffered a broken nose, broken cheekbones and bruising to her eye.

More Nursing Home Near St. Louis Blamed for Injuries to Woman

Florida Woman Charged with Running Abusive Adult Care Home

The owner of an adult care home in Florida was formally charged with running an abusive center. Priscilla Smith Johnson faces allegations of mistreatment of residents, restraining one with handcuffs, as well as instances of the abuse or neglect of others.

Johnson was charged with neglect of a disabled adult, false imprisonment, aggravated abuse and exploitation, Gainesville.com reported, citing a press release from the Florida attorney general’s office. Levy County Sheriff’s Lt. Scott Tummond said that Johnson was in a Gainesville hospital but would be taken to the Alachua County Jail once she is released. News of why she was hospitalized was not made public.

More Florida Woman Charged with Running Abusive Adult Care Home

Nurse’s Aid Charged with Abusing Elderly Woman

An aid in a New York nursing home was arrested late last week in connection with the abuse of an elderly woman, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced.

Sarina Francis, an aid at the Hudson Park Rehabilitation and Nursing Center, was arrested and charged with one count of second-degree endangering the welfare of a vulnerable elderly person or an incompetent or physically disabled person, TimesUnion.com reported. She was also charged with two counts of willful violation of health laws, and one count of second-degree endangering the welfare of an incompetent or physically disabled person, TimesUnion.com reported.

More Nurse’s Aid Charged with Abusing Elderly Woman

Staffing Issues Claimed to Cause Nursing Home Negligence

Elderly care workers say their industry is facing serious staffing issues, which is leading to substandard care for the residents.

Through a series of interviews, ABC’s Lateline program found that workers often do not have enough time to properly feed, hydrate or take to the toilet all of their residents. The program also found that infections and bone fractures can go undiagnosed and that there are at least 10 medication mistakes a month. Staffers told ABC Lateline that lawsuits claiming neglect and abuse against care workers have left the industry short on staffing.

More Staffing Issues Claimed to Cause Nursing Home Negligence

Federal Officials Still Seeking to Lessen Dosing of Nursing Home Residents with Antipsychotic Meds

The federal government says a two-year program designed to reduce the number of people living in nursing homes who are prescribed antipsychotic drugs has not reached its goal.

In recent years, many patients have been prescribed a class of drugs known as atypical antipsychotic drugs. The most popular drugs in this class are sold as Risperdal, Seroquel, Zyprexa, and Abilify and we’ve reported extensively on the side effects associated with them.

More Federal Officials Still Seeking to Lessen Dosing of Nursing Home Residents with Antipsychotic Meds