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Medical Device Maker Facing new Bribery Allegations

Medical Device Maker Facing new Bribery Allegations

Medical Device Maker Facing new Bribery Allegations


Medical device maker Biomet is being investigated by the U.S. Justice Department (D.O.J.) due to fresh bribery allegations.

Prosecutors will extend Biomet’s probation for an additional year, the firm announced earlier this week, in light of recent allegations made by an anonymous whistleblower. According to an email written by the whistleblower, distributors hired by Biomet to sell the company’s orthopedic devices paid kickbacks to government doctors. An internal investigation was launched when Biomet disclosed the email to the government, and several employees at the center of the scandal were fired, according to The New York Times (The Times). More Medical Device Maker Facing new Bribery Allegations

Art Dealer Accused of Jacking up the Price of Rare Works of Art by Millions of Dollars Overseas may Have Ripped off New York Galleries

Art Dealer Accused of Jacking up the Price of Rare Works of Art

Art Dealer Accused of Jacking up the Price of Rare Works of Art


The case of an art collector and dealer who allegedly defrauded other art collectors out of millions of dollars is slowly pulling back the curtain on the art world’s dark underbelly of lies and deception – namely, how much dealers stand to gain, and how much collectors stand to lose.

Swiss businessman and art dealer Yves Bouvier is well-known among the world’s wealthiest art collectors. Bouvier is a collector himself, but often buys and sells expensive pieces for clients. He stores them, as well; Bouvier’s large art-shipping company and holdings in storage facilities known as freeports have made him extremely well-known in the world of high-end art. He is the largest client of a Swiss Freeport and owns more of the facilities in Singapore and Luxembourg. Freeports are sprawling, maximum-security storage sites that are often located near airports to allow wealthy travelers to store expensive valuables in duty-free zones. according to CNBC. More Art Dealer Accused of Jacking up the Price of Rare Works of Art by Millions of Dollars Overseas may Have Ripped off New York Galleries

DirecTV Faces Government Lawsuit Over Allegations that it Duped Customers into Signing up for Two-Year Service

DirecTV Faces Government Lawsuit Over Allegations

DirecTV Faces Government Lawsuit Over Allegations


Allegations of a DirecTV deceptive advertising campaign have prompted the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to file a lawsuit against the satellite television provider.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is suing the satellite television company on behalf of the more than 20 million subscribers in the United States who claim that DirecTV deceptively advertised costs of a two-year service promotion, an agency spokesman said Wednesday. Jessica L. Rich, director of the FTC’s bureau of consumer protection, said the agency is seeking millions of dollars in refunds, according to The New York Times (The Times). More DirecTV Faces Government Lawsuit Over Allegations that it Duped Customers into Signing up for Two-Year Service

Two Recent Court Decisions to Make it Easier for Whistleblowers to File Qui Tam Lawsuits

Court Decisions Make it Easier to File Qui Tam Lawsuits

Court Decisions Make it Easier to File Qui Tam Lawsuits


Filing a qui tam lawsuit under the False Claims Act (FCA) will now be easier for whistleblowers, thanks to two recent court decisions.

The rulings center around the “public disclosure bar,” which dismisses a whistleblower’s case if it is “based upon the public exposure of allegations or transactions” in specific ways, such as via a government “report, hearing, audit or investigation.” The bar is not applicable if the whistleblower is the original source of the information. More Two Recent Court Decisions to Make it Easier for Whistleblowers to File Qui Tam Lawsuits

Flooring Company Facing Class Action Over Allegations That it Sells Defective Products Containing High Levels of Formaldehyde

Company Facing Class Action Over Selling Defective Products

Company Facing Class Action Over Selling Defective Products


The first amended class action complaint has been filed against Lumber Liquidators alleging that some of the company’s flooring products fail prematurely, contain defects and have been associated with very high levels of the cancer-causing agent, formaldehyde.

Plaintiffs in the class action lawsuit allege that their Lumber Liquidators flooring is defective and prone to premature cracking, splitting, warping and shrinking sooner than claimed in the product’s warranty. According to the suit, consumers have also complained that Lumber Liquidator’s flooring contains significantly high levels of formaldehyde, a known carcinogen. More Flooring Company Facing Class Action Over Allegations That it Sells Defective Products Containing High Levels of Formaldehyde

OxyElite Pro Found to Contain Prozac

OxyElite Pro Found to Contain Prozac

OxyElite Pro Found to Contain Prozac


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) told consumers on February 28 to be extra vigilant when purchasing weight loss supplements, specifically mentioning OxyElite Pro, which was found to contain a powerful antidepressant drug.

OxyElite Pro is a thermogenic supplement. It is designed to boost metabolism and burn fat, but it increases the body’s internal temperature. More OxyElite Pro Found to Contain Prozac

Computer Manufacturer Faces Lawsuits After Preloading Laptops with Spyware

Computer manufacturer Lenovo has admitted that it preinstalled spyware on 43 models of its laptops, and angry customers are firing back with lawsuits.

The spyware in question is the “Superfish” software – an Internet browser add-on that causes ads to pop up on your screen when you visit websites. According to CNN Money, the software tampers with a widely used system of official website certificates, making it difficult for computers to recognize bogus websites. More Computer Manufacturer Faces Lawsuits After Preloading Laptops with Spyware

Medtronic will pay the Government to Settle False Claims Allegations

Medtronic will pay the Gov. to Settle False Claims

Medtronic will pay the Gov. to Settle False Claims


Medtronic will pay the United States government to settle a case involving allegations that the medical device maker caused some physicians from more than 20 states to submit false claims to Medicare, TRICARE and other federal health programs for the investigational and non-reimbursable “SubQ stimulation” procedures from 2007 through 2013.

SubQ stimulation devices are spinal cord stimulators that are inserted beneath the skin near an area where the patient is experiencing pain, typically the lower back. The SubQ devices are intended to release electrical impulses that cause a “tingling” meant to amend chronic pain. According to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Medtronic arranged company-sponsored “on-site training programs” for physicians and customers even though the procedure’s safety and efficacy had not yet been established under the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) mandates. More Medtronic will pay the Government to Settle False Claims Allegations

DeflateGate’s Effects Impact Legal Gambling and the Economy

The National Football League (NFL) has initiated a probe into the New England Patriots following allegations that the team intentionally used overly deflated footballs in their recent drubbing against the Indianapolis Colts in the American Football Conference (AFC) Championship Game, according to an NFL spokesman. The Patriots 45-7 win is bringing them to this Sunday’s Super Bowl.

Bob Kravitz of WTHR in Indianapolis, Indiana broke the “DeflateGate” story noting that the referee removed a ball from play, weighing the ball during an oddly placed mid-game delay during New England’s first drive of the second half. Ultimately, the referee swapped the ball out.

Should the probe confirm the allegations that the balls were intentionally deflated to gain an advantage, the Patriots stand a chance of losing draft picks, Kravitz noted. This is not the first time the Patriots have been involved in game scandals. In 2008, the Patriots received a large fine and were docked a first-round draft pick for their involvement in so-called “SpyGate.” Other allegations of ball deflating have been made in the past. In 2012, at the college level, a student manager with the University of Southern California (USC) was dismissed following allegations he deflated balls during a contest.

Under the NFL’s rules, footballs must be inflated between 12.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch. Both teams provide 12 primary balls each for testing prior to play. The referee tests the 24 balls two hours and 15 minutes prior to kickoff.

The intentional deflation of footballs is not unknown and when a football is overly deflated, the player’s grip on the ball is greatly improved and the ball becomes easier to hold, catch, and throw, all of which assist the offense. This is noteworthy given that teams use their own balls on offense.

At issue with DeflateGate is the scandal’s effect on legal sports betting, such as on the Internet and in Las Vegas, Nevada. Clearly, the scandal extends well beyond the game, potentially impacting legal, sanctioned betting operations as well as on the economy in the form of lost jobs, revenue, and taxes.

According to LegalBettingOnline, sports betting is the predicting of “sports results while placing a wager on the outcome according to an agreed upon set of rules or laws.” Wagers may be made against another bettor, a “house,” a “bookie,” or another entity. Legal forms of online sports betting may vary from state to state and by country, with Internet betting having become a multi-million-dollar industry. Sports betting is the most popular form of legalized online betting. In the United States, sports gambling is not permitted on the federal level, with Nevada among the few states that permit such betting. In fact, the American Gaming Association (AGA) notes that only Nevada, Delaware, Oregon, and Montana permit any form of sports betting. Most of the legal sports betting, however, occurs in Las Vegas. Although Nevada only permits bets verifiable in the box score, online and offshore betting does not have the same restrictions.

The Department of Justice indicates that individual states may “determine their own destiny regarding online gambling”; however, “sports betting seems to be the exception to this rule.” In the U.S., the only legal option for online sportsbook wagering is through legally licensed and regulated online sportsbooks, which are located offshore and “operated under the regulatory oversight of a governing jurisdiction which has already legalized online sports betting for their territory, legally allowing them to offer their services to bettors around the world, including those in the United States.”

In 2014, legal bettors spent $119.4 million on wagers, according to The Week, as well as so-called “prop bets.” This year, gamblers will likely pick from more than 500 various “prop bets,” such as what the opening coin toss will be or which team will score first. Props may involve statistical research, historical analysis, and expectations of market behavior. One may expect that these prop bets might now involve Deflate-Gate. For example, how many times during a broadcast will deflated footballs be mentioned?

The first-ever estimates released by the AGA in January 2015 revealed that, while Americans make $100 million in legal bets on the Super Bowl annually, $3.8 billion in illegal bets are made. CitizenLink notes that about 86 percent of Americans have gambled at least once during their lives.

Whistleblower Lawsuit Accuses Health Tech Firm of Making Fraudulent Claims Concerning its Software

Lawsuit Accuses Health Tech Firm - Fraudulent Software

Lawsuit Accuses Health Tech Firm – Fraudulent Software


Two former executives of the health technology firm NantHealth are accusing the company of making fraudulent claims about the reliability of its system.

The former executives filed a lawsuit this week accusing NantHealth of making the fraudulent claims, as well as charges that the company, which links patient information gathered by different medical devices and pieces of hospital equipment, of using company donations to attract federal funds so a hospital could buy its products, according to The New York Times (Times). More Whistleblower Lawsuit Accuses Health Tech Firm of Making Fraudulent Claims Concerning its Software