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Protesters say Nassau County School Zone Speed Camera Program is Unfair

On Sunday, protesters took to the streets of Nassau County in Long Island, New York, to demand the county drop its plans for a school zone speed camera program.

Protesters gathered on Oyster Bay Road in front of Our Lady of Mercy School in Hicksville after learning the county has raked in an average of $200,000 per day from violations. Those at the rally said the rollout of the school zone speed camera program was flawed and they want the county to suspend it. They called for better signage in the areas where the cameras are rolling. There is so much outrage that a group of concerned citizens have formed a group called the Nassau County Residents Opposing School Speed Zone Cameras, according to Long Island News 12. More Protesters say Nassau County School Zone Speed Camera Program is Unfair

GM Ignition Switch Defect Linked to 30 Fatalities

General Motors Co.’s ignition switch defect is attributed to one more death, bringing the death toll up to 30, according to a report from the office of the attorney managing the compensation fund. Since the beginning of October, seven deaths have been linked to the problem, Law360 reports. The report shows that 1,580 total claims have been received since the fund began accepting claims in August; this is up 1,517 from last week.

Millions of cars have been recalled due to the ignition switch defect, which causes cars to stall and disables air bags when the switch unexpectedly takes the car out of “run” mode. Law360 reports that most recalls required replacing or modifying the key. A replacement ignition switch was required in 2.6 million vehicles. More GM Ignition Switch Defect Linked to 30 Fatalities

OxyContin Makers Face Huge Penalty for Allegedly Contributing to Widespread Drug Addiction

After winning more than 400 dismissals of personal-injury lawsuits and avoiding more than 10 efforts to wage class-actions against it, the maker of the highly addictive painkiller OxyContin may have to pay a devastating $1 billion over allegations that the company contributed to widespread drug addiction.

OxyContin, also known as Hillbilly Heroin, is a powerful opioid painkiller that offers 12 hours of time-released relief, which allows patients to take fewer pills. Drug addicts discovered how to defeat the time-release system as soon as OxyContin hit the market in 1995. By crushing the pills, drug abusers could snort or inject the drug for an intense, immediate high. The drug’s maker, Purdue Pharma, developed a tamper-resistant version of OxyContin in 2010, but a 2012 study found that many addicts simply turned to heroin and other drugs to get high, according to NewsLeader.com. More OxyContin Makers Face Huge Penalty for Allegedly Contributing to Widespread Drug Addiction

Parents, Beware of Topical Teething Anesthetics

Topical anesthetics containing Lidocaine Viscous are popular with parents trying sooth their little ones’ teething pain, but the medications can seriously injure, even kill, young patients.

In June, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned against use of the products, particularly those containing more than 2 percent Lidocaine Viscous. The FDA said that it would require a new Boxed Warning, the FDA’s strongest warning, to all packages of the numbing agents. More Parents, Beware of Topical Teething Anesthetics

Study Examines Rate of Medication Errors Young Children

Between 2002 and 2012, a child experienced a medication mistake roughly every eight minutes, a new study shows. The study, which was published in the journal Pediatrics, found that the most errors occurred with painkillers such as aspirin, followed by cough and cold medicines and allergy medicines.

During the 11 year period of the study, researchers found that the rate of reported medication errors increased, except for cough and cold medicines. The authors attributed these findings to the efforts of a multipronged education campaign.“We think that multipronged effort had an effect,” said Henry Spiller, an author of the study and director of the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus to Reuters Health. “We can see a drop associated with these efforts.” More Study Examines Rate of Medication Errors Young Children

New Jersey Defense Attorneys who Used Facebook to Gather Information on a Victim in a Personal Injury Suit Face Ethics Charges

A New Jersey appeals court will decide whether the Office of Attorney Ethics (OAE) has the legal right to file ethics grievances against two defense lawyers who used instructed a paralegal to “friend” the plaintiff in a personal injury case on Facebook to gather information about him, and whether the judges themselves even have the authority to get tangled in the dispute.

In 2007, an Oakland, New Jersey, man filed a lawsuit alleging that he was doing push-ups in the driveway of the local firehouse when he was struck by a police officer’s cruiser. The man suffered a fractured femur that required multiple surgeries. The defense lawyers in the case had a paralegal “friend” the plaintiff on Facebook to gain information about him, court documents obtained by the New Jersey Law Journal show. The plaintiff’s attorney discovered the scheme following a deposition in which one of the accused defense lawyers asked the plaintiff about travel, dancing and other activities they believed would show the plaintiff was overstating the seriousness of his injuries. The police officer’s attorney also supplied amended answers to interrogatories, accompanied by conversations, photos and a video of the plaintiff wrestling with his brothers that were posted on the Facebook pages of the plaintiff and his friends. More New Jersey Defense Attorneys who Used Facebook to Gather Information on a Victim in a Personal Injury Suit Face Ethics Charges

Limited Data on Medication Dosage for Children Leads to Uncertain Prescriptions

When it comes to clinical trials for a new medications, children are hardly ever included. As a result, most prescriptions for children are often more uncertain than for adults. According to Scientific American, only 46 percent of drugs used in kids have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pediatric populations.

In the past, that statistic was much worse. Two pieces of litigation have been crucial to improving the rate of FDA approved drugs for kids. One law is The Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act, which provides motivation by offering exclusive sale rights for a short period of time. The other law is the Pediatric Research Equity Act, which requires clinical testing in children if a drug can be used for the same purpose in children. The issue with this however, is that children often get diseases that adults do not. More Limited Data on Medication Dosage for Children Leads to Uncertain Prescriptions

Appeals Court Upholds Verdict After Allegations of Jury Confusion and Gossip Outside of the Jury Room

A New Jersey appeals court has upheld the verdict of an Ocean City jury despite a possible jury misunderstanding and accusations that one juror called the plaintiff in the personal injury case a liar during discussions outside of the jury room.

The plaintiff in the case sued the driver of a vehicle who allegedly rear-ended her vehicle in 2010 causing the plaintiff to sustain whiplash injuries to her neck. After learning that the jury might not have understood what evidence it was allowed to consider, and that a juror purportedly called her a liar, the plaintiff requested either post-verdict questioning of the jurors or a new trial, but the judge in the case threw out her requests, according to the Law Journal. More Appeals Court Upholds Verdict After Allegations of Jury Confusion and Gossip Outside of the Jury Room

In Whistleblower Trial over Guardrails, Trinity Allegedly Hid Failed Crash Tests

According to The New York Times, Trinity Industries was asked about their failure to disclose five failed crash tests to authorities in a whistleblower trial over their guardrails. Guardrails are put in place as a safety measure when an accident occurs. They are intended to absorb most of the impact when struck head-on in an accident. Additionally, the rail head is supposed to move metal safety out of the way; the flat piece of steel in front of the rail should slide along the rail to do this. Trinity’ changed the design in 2005, making the channel behind the rail head more narrow. This change can cause the head to jam and result in the rail being pushed into a vehicle instead, critics say. More In Whistleblower Trial over Guardrails, Trinity Allegedly Hid Failed Crash Tests

Some Gynecologists are Still Using Power Morcellation to Remove Uterine Fibroid Growths Even After the FDA Warned They Could Spread Cancer

Many gynecologists continue to use power morcellators to remove fibroid tissues despite warnings from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that the devices can spread unseen cancer.

Power morcellators cut fibroid tissues into small pieces that can be extracted through small incisions. The laparoscopic (minimally invasive) surgical technique is supposed to allow patients to recover more quickly with fewer complications and less blood loss. About 50,000 morcellation procedures are performed each year. In April 2014, the FDA asked surgeons to place a moratorium on morcellators in a safety advisory, but some doctors have ignored the agency’s pleas, saying the risks are overblown, according to EmpowerHER.com. More Some Gynecologists are Still Using Power Morcellation to Remove Uterine Fibroid Growths Even After the FDA Warned They Could Spread Cancer