To Get Help Now
Click Here
 
Today's Date:

Uterine Fibroid Procedure May Cause Cancer, FDA Warns

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advised doctors on Thursday to stop using power morcellators in laparoscopic uterine fibroid removal surgeries because of cancer concerns. The agency said the surgical technique could unexpectedly spread cancerous tissue into a patient’s stomach.

The FDA recommended that doctors look into other treatment methods for symptomatic fibroids rather than using the tool to remove fibroids or a woman’s uterus laparoscopically, according to Law360. Despite the severity of the risks, the agency didn’t remove the nearly two-dozen power morcellators from the market. More Uterine Fibroid Procedure May Cause Cancer, FDA Warns

European Agency Investigating Testosterone Therapy Link to Cardiovascular Risk

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is following the footsteps us the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and launching an investigation into testosterone therapies to find out what potential cardiovascular side effects they may cause.

The EMA’s decision to act is based on the same pair of studies the FDA cited when it opened an investigation in February. A November study that appeared in the Journal of American Medical Association found a greater risk of cardiovascular injury and death in Veterans Affairs population, according to MedPageToday. A January study in Plus One also found that men 65-years and older were at an increased risk of cardiovascular issues when on the testosterone drugs.

More European Agency Investigating Testosterone Therapy Link to Cardiovascular Risk

Remington Model 700 and Remington Model Seven Rifles Recalled Due to Risk of Unintentional Discharge

Gun manufacturer Remington has announced a safety recall of Model 700 and Model Seven rifles. The rifles affected by the recall have a X-Mark Pro, or XMP triggers and were manufactured between May 1, 2006 and April 9, 2014.

The recall was issued after Remington found out that rifles equipped with the XMP trigger can fire unintentionally, according to Gunds.com. The issue is very dangerous and could prove fatal if not addressed. Remington said the issue is specific to the XMP trigger only, and all other Model 700 and Model Seven rifles are unaffected by the recall. More Remington Model 700 and Remington Model Seven Rifles Recalled Due to Risk of Unintentional Discharge

EU Regulators Reviewing Testosterone Medication Heart Risks

The European Medicines Agency is reviewing testosterone medications after studies suggested the drugs may be linked to cardiovascular risks.

The European Union’s (EU) drug regulator will study the benefits and risks of testosterone products and conclude whether the marketing for the medications should be maintained, altered, suspended, or withdrawn, Bloomberg.com reported. More EU Regulators Reviewing Testosterone Medication Heart Risks

Use of NSAIDs Linked to Atrial Fibrillation

Older people who use common prescription painkillers, including prescription-strength ibuprofen, may be at an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation, or an irregular heartbeat, according to a new study.

Atrial fibrillation has been known to increase the risk of stroke and heart failure and can lead to death, Health Day News reported. The latest study joins a host of others to link these painkillers – called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs – to a risk of heart attack and stroke. More Use of NSAIDs Linked to Atrial Fibrillation

Texas Family Tells Jury of Air Quality Poisoned by Local Natural Gas Drilling

A Texas family told a Dallas jury on Tuesday that they are being sickened by natural gas wells near their property that are owned by Texas-based Aruba Petroleum, Inc.  A $9 million nuisance lawsuit filed against the company by the family is one of the first trials seeking to hold a company liable for medical problems allegedly linked to chemicals used in fracking.

The Parr family alleges that Aruba Petroleum exposed them to dangerous chemicals, gases, and industrial waste at some of the company’s 22 gas wells drilled near their 40-acre property in Wise County. They allege they’ve suffered numerous health problems, some of them so severe that they were unable to work and were forced to live in Bob Parr’s office instead of their home. The Parrs say their medical problems were caused by benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and other volatile organic compounds from the drilling sites, according to Law360.com. More Texas Family Tells Jury of Air Quality Poisoned by Local Natural Gas Drilling

Intuitive Sales Drop as Da Vinci Lawsuits Pile Up

In a year where Intuitive Surgical has issued a series of recalls and been hit with an influx of lawsuits, the company is also seeing financial woes.

Intuitive announced its first-quarter revenue declined about 24 percent as sales of its robotic surgery system took a plunge. In a statement released by Intuitive, the company said it shipped 87 robots in the first quarter compared with 164 a year earlier. Intuitive also suffered a charge of $67 million to reflect estimated costs of settling product liability claims. Most of the claims are related to alleged complications from surgeries performed with certain robotic scissors or tip covers that have since been taken off the market, Bloomberg News reported. More Intuitive Sales Drop as Da Vinci Lawsuits Pile Up

Jury Finds Takeda and Eli Lilly Guilty in Actos Trial

A federal jury found Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. and Eli Lilly & Co. guilty of hiding cancer risks associated with their diabetes drug Actos and ordered the companies to pay a combined $9 billion in punitive damages in the first U.S. trial of its kind.

The verdict came down Monday. Takeda took the brunt of the punishment, getting hit with a $6 billion charge. Eli Lilly was ordered to pay $3 billion. The judge earlier awarded $1.5 million in compensatory damages to Terrence Allen, who blamed the drug for his cancer. The $9 billion verdict is the seventh largest in U.S. history, according to Bloomberg News. More Jury Finds Takeda and Eli Lilly Guilty in Actos Trial

Janssen Pharmaceuticals Settles 76 Topamax Birth Defects Cases

Johnson & Johnson (J&J) has settled with 76 plaintiffs who alleged birth defects in the babies of women who took the anti-epilepsy and migraine drug Topamax during their pregnancies.

Judge Arnold New filed an order last Tuesday marking 76 of the cases as discontinued after receiving confirmation that the plaintiffs had reached settlement agreements with J&J’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals unit. Judge New is coordinating a mass tort docket of Topamax cases in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, according to Law360.com. More Janssen Pharmaceuticals Settles 76 Topamax Birth Defects Cases

Battery Defect in Ventilators puts Patients at Risk for Unexpected Lapse in Ventilation

Evita V500 and Babylog VN500 ventilators are being recalled by the Pennsylvania-based company, Draeger Medical, due to battery issues that could put patients at risk. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave the recall their highest-risk Class I label.

The batteries installed in the Evita V500 and the Babylog VN500 ventilators may suddenly fail without triggering alarms or indicating a low battery supply, which puts patients at risk for an unexpected lapse in ventilation that could result in injury or death. There may be no indication of a diminished battery until all power is lost, according to MassDevice.com More Battery Defect in Ventilators puts Patients at Risk for Unexpected Lapse in Ventilation